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Steve Barker gravatar image

What is the generator voltage like when directly connected to increasing loads rather than to the inverter-charger? If it behaves sensibly then there must be some sort of feedback coming from the inverter-charger that the AVR sensor circuit is seeing and causing it to overcompensate. If this proves to be the case then maybe a filtering circuit is needed?

The chaps on this forum may be able to help: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

Don't forget to let us know how you get on! Tricky one this!

All the best //Steve

What is the generator voltage like when directly connected to increasing loads rather than to the inverter-charger? If it behaves sensibly then there must be some sort of feedback coming from the inverter-charger that the AVR sensor circuit is seeing and causing it to overcompensate. If this proves to be the case then maybe a filtering circuit is needed?needed? Or perhaps the inverter-charger is a leading power factor device - this paper offers a clue: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

The chaps on this forum may be able to help: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

Don't forget to let us know how you get on! Tricky one this!

All the best //Steve

What is the generator voltage like when directly connected to increasing loads rather than to the inverter-charger? If it behaves sensibly then there must be some sort of feedback coming from the inverter-charger that the AVR sensor circuit is seeing and causing it to overcompensate. If this proves to be the case then maybe a filtering circuit is needed? Or perhaps the inverter-charger is a leading power factor device - this paper offers a clue: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0 If so then maybe power factor corrections is needed?

The chaps on this forum may be able to help: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

Don't forget to let us know how you get on! Tricky one this!

All the best //Steve

What is the generator voltage like when directly connected to increasing loads rather than to the inverter-charger? If it behaves sensibly then there must be some sort of feedback or harmonics coming from the inverter-charger that the AVR sensor circuit is seeing and causing it to overcompensate. If this proves to be the case then maybe a filtering circuit is needed? Or perhaps the inverter-charger is a leading power factor device and this is causing the problem - this paper offers a clue: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0 If so then maybe power factor corrections is needed?

Have you contacted Vectron?

The chaps on this forum may be able to help: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

Don't forget to let us know how you get on! Tricky one this!

All the best //Steve

What I posted an answer on this last night and then woke up thinking "Oh no! That doesn't make sense!" so here goes again in the spirit of trying to help. . Is the AVR a separate box - one of the clickety-click types on the market there or is it more sophisticated? . How does the generator behave when loaded by a more straightforward resistive kind of load like a heating element when the AVR (if a separate item) is not in the loop? Put a couple of different resistive loads on it and check the voltage like when directly connected to increasing loads rather than to the inverter-charger? If it behaves sensibly then there must be some sort of feedback and frequency. Why do you need an AVR if using a small generator or harmonics do you sometimes have mains power that is unreliable? . Have you checked the voltage and frequency coming from the inverter-charger generator? (I was under what may be a false belief that the AVR sensor circuit is seeing and causing it to overcompensate. If this proves these small portable generators used speed regulation to maintain voltage so if you see a frequency rise on increasing load I would suspect the generator speed regulation to be the case then maybe a filtering circuit is needed? Or perhaps the inverter-charger is a leading power factor device and this is causing the problem - this paper offers a clue: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0 If so then maybe power factor corrections is needed?

Have you contacted Vectron?at fault.)

The chaps on this forum may be able to help: http://www.fieldlines.com/index.php?topic=147381.0

Don't forget to let us know how you get on! Tricky one this!

All the best //Steve