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Hi Mark,

Not sure about the options you mention - other people would need to answer. However I have found this doc by... WaterAid! C:\fakepath\WaterAid - New sanitation technologies for communities with poor soil.pdf

I have done toilet pits with trapezoidal blocks, ie blocks with a hollow centre which use much less cement (and you can space them at the bottom to help infiltration if using water), see doc attached (BoQ for a pour-flush toilet in Tanzania with pit lined with these. C:\fakepath\BOQ - Pour-flush.docx

If you are in a dense urban settlement, using barrels (plastic or metal drums) may be an option if at the same time developing an emptying system such as gulpers. They often can't empty below depths of 1 metre so it's not useful to dig more than that, and it makes the toilet cheaper (admittedly only valid if emptying is an affordable recurring cost). But if sludge collected can composted / dried and used a soil conditioner or fertiliser, it can reduce emptying fees.

Rémi

Hi Mark,

Not sure about the options you mention - other people would need to answer. However I have found this doc by... WaterAid! C:\fakepath\WaterAid WaterAid - New sanitation technologies for communities with poor soil.pdf

I have done toilet pits with trapezoidal blocks, ie blocks with a hollow centre which use much less cement (and you can space them at the bottom to help infiltration if using water), see doc attached (BoQ for a pour-flush toilet in Tanzania with pit lined with these. C:\fakepath\BOQ BOQ - Pour-flush.docx

If you are in a dense urban settlement, using barrels (plastic or metal drums) may be an option if at the same time developing an emptying system such as gulpers. They often can't empty below depths of 1 metre so it's not useful to dig more than that, and it makes the toilet cheaper (admittedly only valid if emptying is an affordable recurring cost). But if sludge collected can composted / dried and used a soil conditioner or fertiliser, it can reduce emptying fees.

Rémi

Hi Mark,

Not sure about the options you mention - other people would need to answer. However I have found this doc by... WaterAid! WaterAid - New sanitation technologies for communities with poor soil.pdf

I have done toilet pits with trapezoidal blocks, ie i.e. blocks with a hollow centre which use much less cement (and you can space them at the bottom to help infiltration if using water), water) see doc attached (BoQ for a pour-flush toilet in Tanzania with pit lined with these. BOQ - Pour-flush.docx

If you are in a dense urban settlement, using barrels (plastic or metal drums) may be an option if at the same time developing an emptying system such as gulpers. They often can't empty below depths of 1 metre 1m so it's not useful to dig more than that, and it makes the toilet cheaper (admittedly only valid if emptying is an affordable recurring cost). But if sludge collected can composted / dried and used a soil conditioner or fertiliser, it can reduce emptying fees.

Rémi